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Is the use of the expression "past-dweller" correct in the phrases below:

Please, don't take me for a past-dweller. Some of today's songs are great, and I like them, but none of them are as good as the ones we had in the sixties and seventies.

and

Your days of fame and glory are gone. You must stop being a past-dweller, get yourself a real job, and start living life as an ordinary person, just like everybody else in the family.

Is this expression commonly used in English? Are
Are there any alternatives that would sound more colloquial?strong text

Is the use of the expression "past-dweller" correct in the phrases below:

Please, don't take me for a past-dweller. Some of today's songs are great, and I like them, but none of them are as good as the ones we had in the sixties and seventies.

and

Your days of fame and glory are gone. You must stop being a past-dweller, get yourself a real job, and start living life as an ordinary person, just like everybody else in the family.

Is this expression commonly used in English? Are there any alternatives that would sound more colloquial?strong text

Is the use of the expression "past-dweller" correct in the phrases below:

Please, don't take me for a past-dweller. Some of today's songs are great, and I like them, but none of them are as good as the ones we had in the sixties and seventies.

and

Your days of fame and glory are gone. You must stop being a past-dweller, get yourself a real job, and start living life as an ordinary person, just like everybody else in the family.

Is this expression commonly used in English?
Are there any alternatives that would sound more colloquial?

1
source | link

Use of "past-dweller"

Is the use of the expression "past-dweller" correct in the phrases below:

Please, don't take me for a past-dweller. Some of today's songs are great, and I like them, but none of them are as good as the ones we had in the sixties and seventies.

and

Your days of fame and glory are gone. You must stop being a past-dweller, get yourself a real job, and start living life as an ordinary person, just like everybody else in the family.

Is this expression commonly used in English? Are there any alternatives that would sound more colloquial?strong text