2 added 2 characters in body
source | link

This is a figure of speech used in some novels written in the 19th century (and possibly earlier). It simply means that the writer chooses not to specify the exact year -- and itthe year doesn't really matter -- but it was sometime in the 1700s.

"The year of grace" is a variation on "The year of our lord"Lord", both of which are an English version of the Latin Anno Domini (AD). So again, the writer means 17-something17xx AD.

This is a figure of speech used in some novels written in the 19th century (and possibly earlier). It simply means that the writer chooses not to specify the exact year -- and it doesn't really matter -- but it was sometime in the 1700s.

"The year of grace" is a variation on "The year of our lord", both of which are an English version of the Latin Anno Domini (AD). So again, the writer means 17-something AD.

This is a figure of speech used in some novels written in the 19th century (and possibly earlier). It simply means that the writer chooses not to specify the exact year -- the year doesn't really matter -- but it was sometime in the 1700s.

"The year of grace" is a variation on "The year of our Lord", both of which are an English version of the Latin Anno Domini (AD). So again, the writer means 17xx AD.

1
source | link

This is a figure of speech used in some novels written in the 19th century (and possibly earlier). It simply means that the writer chooses not to specify the exact year -- and it doesn't really matter -- but it was sometime in the 1700s.

"The year of grace" is a variation on "The year of our lord", both of which are an English version of the Latin Anno Domini (AD). So again, the writer means 17-something AD.