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Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say *a police.


In this answer, the * symbol indicates that a phrase or sentence is ungrammatical.

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say *a police.

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say *a police.


In this answer, the * symbol indicates that a phrase or sentence is ungrammatical.

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Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say 'a*a police.'.

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say 'a police.'

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say *a police.

2 edited body
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Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say *a'a police.'.

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say *a police.

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form.

The police are here.  ← This is okay.
*A police is here.     ← This is not.

Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer:

A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay.
Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay.

The latter sentence is fine if it's clear from context that you mean a police officer.

But in any case, you can't say 'a police.'

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