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  1. Signing the contract was a great victory for me. (there's no competition; even the word victory is a stretch, but it's very commonly employed in the figurative sense)
  2. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victorytriumph for France. (depends on how much you wanna emphasize it)
  3. The team returned home in triumphme. (sense 2 of the noun)
  4. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia? (this depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory; newspaper headlines are often full of hyperbole and will readily opt for the former, but I doubt anyone would actually use it in speech)

Both are figurative in meaning, and the choice depends on how much you want to emphasize your emerging as victor. I'd prefer the former over the latter because in this particular instance, a triumph is already great enough, so a victory is what I think would be the usual choice.

In an example (provided by user Andrew in a comment) like

After extensive negotiations, we signed a recording contract with Taylor Swift, a triumph for our label.

triumph sounds completely acceptable.

  1. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France.

Again, depends on how much you want to emphasize your victory. And again, tremendous triumph would be dispreferred due to alliteration and the same reason as above. For some reason greatest triumph sounds fine (see this chart).

  1. The team returned home in triumph.

I choose triumph here over victory because I think sense 2 of the noun is intended (see this chart)

  1. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia?

This again depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory, except here both sound fine.


Note: LDOCE says in the thesaurus section here that triumph is mostly used in writing. It labels it as formal elsewhere. I would heed those caveats if I were you. (I.e., the word's pretty much restricted to writing, and thus more literary and formal stuff.)

Newspapers are notorious hyperbolists and will readily opt for triumph; that doesn't mean every measly victory is a triumph. As MW reports, the word has military and war connotations, and victory little less so, so that's the imagery you're evoking, if you ask me.

  1. Signing the contract was a great victory for me. (there's no competition; even the word victory is a stretch, but it's very commonly employed in the figurative sense)
  2. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France. (depends on how much you wanna emphasize it)
  3. The team returned home in triumph. (sense 2 of the noun)
  4. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia? (this depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory; newspaper headlines are often full of hyperbole and will readily opt for the former, but I doubt anyone would actually use it in speech)
  1. Signing the contract was a great victory / triumph for me.

Both are figurative in meaning, and the choice depends on how much you want to emphasize your emerging as victor. I'd prefer the former over the latter because in this particular instance, a triumph is already great enough, so a victory is what I think would be the usual choice.

In an example (provided by user Andrew in a comment) like

After extensive negotiations, we signed a recording contract with Taylor Swift, a triumph for our label.

triumph sounds completely acceptable.

  1. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France.

Again, depends on how much you want to emphasize your victory. And again, tremendous triumph would be dispreferred due to alliteration and the same reason as above. For some reason greatest triumph sounds fine (see this chart).

  1. The team returned home in triumph.

I choose triumph here over victory because I think sense 2 of the noun is intended (see this chart)

  1. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia?

This again depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory, except here both sound fine.


Note: LDOCE says in the thesaurus section here that triumph is mostly used in writing. It labels it as formal elsewhere. I would heed those caveats if I were you. (I.e., the word's pretty much restricted to writing, and thus more literary and formal stuff.)

Newspapers are notorious hyperbolists and will readily opt for triumph; that doesn't mean every measly victory is a triumph. As MW reports, the word has military and war connotations, and victory little less so, so that's the imagery you're evoking, if you ask me.

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  1. Signing the contract was a great victory for me. (there's no competition; even the word victory is a stretch, but it's very commonly employed in the figurative sense)
  2. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France. (depends on how much you wanna emphasize it)
  3. The team returned home in triumph. (sense 2 of the noun)
  4. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia? (this depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory; newspaper headlines are often full of hyperbole and will readily opt for the former, but I doubt anyone would actually use it in speech)
  1. Signing the contract was a great victory for me. (there's no competition; even the word victory is a stretch, but it's very commonly employed in the figurative sense)
  2. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France. (depends on how much you wanna emphasize it)
  3. The team returned home in triumph. (sense 2 of the noun)
  4. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia? (this depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory; newspaper headlines are often full of hyperbole)
  1. Signing the contract was a great victory for me. (there's no competition; even the word victory is a stretch, but it's very commonly employed in the figurative sense)
  2. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France. (depends on how much you wanna emphasize it)
  3. The team returned home in triumph. (sense 2 of the noun)
  4. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia? (this depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory; newspaper headlines are often full of hyperbole and will readily opt for the former, but I doubt anyone would actually use it in speech)
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  1. Signing the contract was a great victory for me. (there's no competition; even the word victory is a stretch, but it's very commonly employed in the figurative sense)
  2. That agreement was a tremendous diplomatic triumph / victory for France. (depends on how much you wanna emphasize it)
  3. The team returned home in triumph. (sense 2 of the noun)
  4. Do you remember Spain's triumph over / victory against Russia? (this depends on how much you want to emphasize their struggle, or the importance, etc., of their victory; newspaper headlines are often full of hyperbole)