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Questions about punctuation depend on what style guide you adopt. There is no universal agreement on punctuating English.

My personal guide is whether there would be a pause if the sentence were spoken. I would say

Then brief pause along the way brief pause their love started to fade

so I would write

Then, along the way, their love started to fade.

The purpose of punctuation is to provide to a reader clues to meaning that are given to a listener by stress and interruptions. Punctuation does not exist in the grammar of English as a spoken language.

EDIT: English as spoken (except by Viktor Borge) has no punctuation, but has many other extra-verbal cues to meaning that do not exist in written English. There is a significant statistical correlation between quite brief interruptions to the speaker's habitual pace of speech and the use of commas specified as appropriate by many style guides. I did not intend to imply that questions such as the recommended distinctions among the usage of comma, semicolon, colon, dash, and period can also be determined by mimicking quite brief interruptions in a speaker's habitual pace of speech. That is a useful guide to the presence or absence of a comma, but it does not guarantee adherence to all the requirements of any specific edition of any specific style guide.

Questions about punctuation depend on what style guide you adopt. There is no universal agreement on punctuating English.

My personal guide is whether there would be a pause if the sentence were spoken. I would say

Then brief pause along the way brief pause their love started to fade

so I would write

Then, along the way, their love started to fade.

The purpose of punctuation is to provide to a reader clues to meaning that are given to a listener by stress and interruptions. Punctuation does not exist in the grammar of English as a spoken language.

Questions about punctuation depend on what style guide you adopt. There is no universal agreement on punctuating English.

My personal guide is whether there would be a pause if the sentence were spoken. I would say

Then brief pause along the way brief pause their love started to fade

so I would write

Then, along the way, their love started to fade.

The purpose of punctuation is to provide to a reader clues to meaning that are given to a listener by stress and interruptions. Punctuation does not exist in the grammar of English as a spoken language.

EDIT: English as spoken (except by Viktor Borge) has no punctuation, but has many other extra-verbal cues to meaning that do not exist in written English. There is a significant statistical correlation between quite brief interruptions to the speaker's habitual pace of speech and the use of commas specified as appropriate by many style guides. I did not intend to imply that questions such as the recommended distinctions among the usage of comma, semicolon, colon, dash, and period can also be determined by mimicking quite brief interruptions in a speaker's habitual pace of speech. That is a useful guide to the presence or absence of a comma, but it does not guarantee adherence to all the requirements of any specific edition of any specific style guide.

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source | link

Questions about punctuation depend on what style guide you adopt. There is no universal agreement on punctuating English.

My personal guide is whether there would be a pause if the sentence were spoken. I would say

Then brief pause along the way brief pause their love started to fade

so I would write

Then, along the way, their love started to fade.

The purpose of punctuation is to provide to a reader clues to meaning that are given to a listener by stress and interruptions. Punctuation does not exist in the grammar of English as a spoken language.