2 Expanded to more general usage.
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« Moi oui », and « moi non » are conversational usage, not formal language. So the most appropriate translations would be the English colloquialisms “me too!” and “me neither!”

Nota bene: French is not my native language.

Edit: This only applies when the speaker agrees with the initial assertion. If the opposite sense is intended (Nobody knows how to open this can!? Moi oui .) the correct response would be the affirmative “I do!” Similarly, a more generic version of « Moi non » would be “Not me!” However, in English a double negative may or may not make an affirmative (colloquial usage is variable), so choose with care.

« Moi oui », and « moi non » are conversational usage, not formal language. So the most appropriate translations would be the English colloquialisms “me too!” and “me neither!”

Nota bene: French is not my native language.

« Moi oui », and « moi non » are conversational usage, not formal language. So the most appropriate translations would be the English colloquialisms “me too!” and “me neither!”

Nota bene: French is not my native language.

Edit: This only applies when the speaker agrees with the initial assertion. If the opposite sense is intended (Nobody knows how to open this can!? Moi oui .) the correct response would be the affirmative “I do!” Similarly, a more generic version of « Moi non » would be “Not me!” However, in English a double negative may or may not make an affirmative (colloquial usage is variable), so choose with care.

1
source | link

« Moi oui », and « moi non » are conversational usage, not formal language. So the most appropriate translations would be the English colloquialisms “me too!” and “me neither!”

Nota bene: French is not my native language.