3 typo + formatting
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As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

"Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English."

Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English.

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my lerarner'slearner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". For example: "Voters fall into three main categories." "Students over 25 fall into a different category." 

"Voters fall into three main categories."
"Students over 25 fall into a different category."

So, is "fall into" different from "fall under" when we talk about categories?

As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

"Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English."

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my lerarner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". For example: "Voters fall into three main categories." "Students over 25 fall into a different category."

So, is "fall into" different from "fall under" when we talk about categories?

As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English.

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my learner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". For example:  

"Voters fall into three main categories."
"Students over 25 fall into a different category."

So, is "fall into" different from "fall under" when we talk about categories?

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2 added 148 characters in body; edited tags
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As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

"Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English."

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my lerarner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". Is the former one less common in practiceFor example: "Voters fall into three main categories." "Students over 25 fall into a different category."

So, is "fall into" different from "fall under" when we talk about categories?

As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

"Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English."

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my lerarner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". Is the former one less common in practice?

As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

"Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English."

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my lerarner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". For example: "Voters fall into three main categories." "Students over 25 fall into a different category."

So, is "fall into" different from "fall under" when we talk about categories?

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fall into a category vs. fall under a category

As far as I know, when a group of people or things with particular features in common are classified we can use "fall into a category". But quite recently I came across the following sentence in a linguistics book published by Hodder Education:

"Notice that these examples fall under well-established categories of acceptable, standard English."

There is no record of "fall under a category" in none of my lerarner's dictionaries. Instead, they all say "fall into a category". Is the former one less common in practice?