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The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on or advocating for some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

Credit to JR for mentioning another possible meaningmentioning another possible meaning of put before the world: to express the idea for everyone to hear, metaphorically placing the truth in front of the entire world so that it may be examined and understood. This meaning is at least as likely as my initial interpretation.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything else; or, a poet expresses some truth to as many people as possible. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), it is still not guaranteed that the poet can completely and correctly explain it to anyone else.

The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on or advocating for some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

Credit to JR for mentioning another possible meaning of put before the world: to express the idea for everyone to hear, metaphorically placing the truth in front of the entire world so that it may be examined and understood. This meaning is at least as likely as my initial interpretation.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything else; or, a poet expresses some truth to as many people as possible. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), it is still not guaranteed that the poet can completely and correctly explain it to anyone else.

The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on or advocating for some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

Credit to JR for mentioning another possible meaning of put before the world: to express the idea for everyone to hear, metaphorically placing the truth in front of the entire world so that it may be examined and understood. This meaning is at least as likely as my initial interpretation.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything else; or, a poet expresses some truth to as many people as possible. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), it is still not guaranteed that the poet can completely and correctly explain it to anyone else.
2 added 462 characters in body
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The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on or advocating for some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

Credit to JR for mentioning another possible meaning of put before the world: to express the idea for everyone to hear, metaphorically placing the truth in front of the entire world so that it may be examined and understood. This meaning is at least as likely as my initial interpretation.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything elseelse; or, a poet expresses some truth to as many people as possible. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), the poetit is still may not be able to properlyguaranteed that the poet can completely and correctly explain it to anyone else.

The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything else. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), the poet still may not be able to properly explain it to anyone else.

The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on or advocating for some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

Credit to JR for mentioning another possible meaning of put before the world: to express the idea for everyone to hear, metaphorically placing the truth in front of the entire world so that it may be examined and understood. This meaning is at least as likely as my initial interpretation.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything else; or, a poet expresses some truth to as many people as possible. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), it is still not guaranteed that the poet can completely and correctly explain it to anyone else.
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The general thrust of this sentence is roughly "placing an extremely high value on some piece of knowledge does not guarantee the ability to fully understand or properly express that knowledge". It's presented as an aphorism, generalized to a prototypical poet. Good poets are able to express things very well, and (I presume this is so in the author's cultural context) assumed to be very intelligent. The statement conveys the idea that everyone is susceptible to these mistakes, because even someone as wise and eloquent as a poet can make them.

A breakdown:

1) Because a poet puts a particular truth before the world

Adding just to the beginning or changing because to even though will make the meaning of this clause more clear. It sets the stage which the rest of the saying is contrasted against. Puts before means values higher than. This is idiomatic; no one can literally physically place either an abstract concept or the entire planet somewhere. The poet values some truth or piece of knowledge more than the entire world; this is poetic license used to show just how strongly the poet cares about that truth. It's extremely unlikely (though possible) that someone would value a particular fact above everything else.

2) it does not necessarily follow that

Even if what was just said (1) is true, what follows (3 and 4) may be false.

3) he has known or worked out all its great consequences

(This should be read as a potentially false statement) The poet fully understands the meaning and effects of the truth.

4) or that having done so, he is able always to express them fully

Or that having done so tells us to assume that 3 is true (remember, the overall point is that 3 and 4 are very possibly false). The meaning here is that the poet fully understands the truth and is able to correctly and completely explain it to others.

Putting it all together, we can parse it like so:

  1. A poet values some truth more than anything else. (This is the premise; it gives us our starting point and context for the rest of the passage.)
  2. Understand that just because 1 is true...
  3. It is not guaranteed that the poet completely understands that knowledge.
  4. Even with perfect understanding of the truth (i.e. even if 3 is true), the poet still may not be able to properly explain it to anyone else.