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BillJ
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When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing from the basic construction.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction, and like most comparative clauses would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into is obligatorily reduced. In full, it would be would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would stare at her.

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing from the basic construction.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction, and like most comparative clauses would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into is obligatorily reduced. In full, it would be would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would stare at her.

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing from the basic construction.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction, and like most comparative clauses would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into is obligatorily reduced. In full, it would be would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into stare at her.

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BillJ
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When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing from the basic construction.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction, and like most comparative clauses would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into is obligatorily reduced. In full, it would be would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would stare at her.

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction.

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing from the basic construction.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction, and like most comparative clauses would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into is obligatorily reduced. In full, it would be would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would stare at her.

added 53 characters in body
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BillJ
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When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction.

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as would a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into.

There's nothing missing.

Your example contains subject-auxiliary inversion, where the subject "a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into" and the auxiliary verb "would" have switched places.

The basic order would be:

When she opened her eyes she saw a harbor seal, twenty feet in front of her, staring at her as a calm dog whose yard she'd walked into would.

Incidentally, this is a comparative construction.

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BillJ
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