2 Grammar, formatting
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It depends on the context in which the both words are used. Generally, there is little to noneno difference. However, a person may use 'certain'certain to add more power to his statement, when he is completely positive for. For example:

I am certain that Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today. 

I am certain that Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.

A greater emphasis is added on onesto one's sentence when using the word certaincertain. On the other hand, when using 'sure'sure it does not always sound confident, and you can tell that in the way it is pronoucedpronounced most of the time, for. For example:

 I'm sure Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.
 or
 I'm sure I left my mobile at home.
 I'm certain I left my mobile at home. 

I'm sure Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.

with certainor

I'm sure I left my mobile at home.

I'm certain I left my mobile at home.

With certain you completely believe that you left your mobile at home. I hope this has answered your question.

It depends on the context in which the both words are used. Generally, there is little to none difference. However, a person may use 'certain' to add more power to his statement, when he is completely positive for example:

I am certain that Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today. 

A greater emphasis is added on ones sentence when using the word certain. On the other hand, when using 'sure' it does not always sound confident, and you can tell that in the way it is pronouced most of the time, for example:

 I'm sure Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.
 or
 I'm sure I left my mobile at home.
 I'm certain I left my mobile at home. 

with certain you completely believe that you left your mobile at home. I hope this has answered your question.

It depends on the context in which both words are used. Generally, there is little to no difference. However, a person may use certain to add more power to his statement when he is completely positive. For example:

I am certain that Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.

A greater emphasis is added to one's sentence when using the word certain. On the other hand, when using sure it does not always sound confident, and you can tell that in the way it is pronounced most of the time. For example:

I'm sure Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.

or

I'm sure I left my mobile at home.

I'm certain I left my mobile at home.

With certain you completely believe that you left your mobile at home. I hope this has answered your question.

1
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It depends on the context in which the both words are used. Generally, there is little to none difference. However, a person may use 'certain' to add more power to his statement, when he is completely positive for example:

I am certain that Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today. 

A greater emphasis is added on ones sentence when using the word certain. On the other hand, when using 'sure' it does not always sound confident, and you can tell that in the way it is pronouced most of the time, for example:

 I'm sure Costa Rica beat Italy in the World Cup match today.
 or
 I'm sure I left my mobile at home.
 I'm certain I left my mobile at home. 

with certain you completely believe that you left your mobile at home. I hope this has answered your question.