4 Clarified that choice of orthography in Canadian English is neither strongly prescriptivist nor a complete free-for-all
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Sure. It's called For example, Canadian English or Australian Englishhas standard spellings that are derived from both British and American influences.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite. That is the form that would be chosen in formal publications. However, but in generalpractice, Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss, and favorite would also be commonly seen.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

Caution: "Official" usage doesn't always paint an accurate picture of common Canadian English usage. For example, Transport Canada (government) regulations all use aeroplane, while the CBC (media) and everyone else in Canada use airplane.

Sure. It's called Canadian English or Australian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

Sure. For example, Canadian English has standard spellings that are derived from both British and American influences.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite. That is the form that would be chosen in formal publications. However, in practice, Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss, and favorite would also be commonly seen.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

Caution: "Official" usage doesn't always paint an accurate picture of common Canadian English usage. For example, Transport Canada (government) regulations all use aeroplane, while the CBC (media) and everyone else in Canada use airplane.

3 Mentioning the other English between British and American
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Sure. It's called Canadian English or Australian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

Sure. It's called Canadian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

Sure. It's called Canadian English or Australian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

2 Elaborated on "kerb" and "tyre"
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Sure. It's called Canadian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

Sure. It's called Canadian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Sure. It's called Canadian English.

Canadian spelling of the English language combines British and American conventions.

  • French-derived words retain British spellings (colour or centre). While the United States uses the Anglo-French spelling defense or offense (noun), Canadians use the British spellings defence and offence (defensive and offensive are universal).
  • Use of curb and tire in contrast to British English kerb and tyre.
  • Words ending in -ise use "-ize" after the US English convention.
  • Some nouns take -ice while matching verbs take -ise, as with practice and practise, licence and license.
  • Canadian spelling can retain the British practice of doubling consonants when adding suffixes to words even when the final syllable (before the suffix) is not stressed, as with travelled, counselling, and controllable.)

The preferred Canadian spelling is favourite, but in general Canadians tolerate both British and American spellings with little fuss.

Note, however, that there are a few words for which Canadians do have a definite spelling preference. Kerb and tyre would look markedly out of place in Canada. I speculate that it's because they are more modern concepts, and therefore subjected more to American influence. Also, there is a popular chain of hardware stores called Canadian Tire, which would make tyre un-Canadian.

1
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