3 missing word added
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collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I am going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.

In my view Collins's two items (prediction and intention) do not cover all uses of gF (going future). They should have a third item

3 you use gF whenever you tell someone something new that has some importance.

  • Mary is going to have a baby.
  • Mr. Jones is going to leave the firm.

collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.

In my view Collins's two items (prediction and intention) do not cover all uses of gF (going future). They should have a third item

3 you use gF whenever you tell someone something new that has some importance.

  • Mary is going to have a baby.
  • Mr. Jones is going to leave the firm.

collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I am going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.

In my view Collins's two items (prediction and intention) do not cover all uses of gF (going future). They should have a third item

3 you use gF whenever you tell someone something new that has some importance.

  • Mary is going to have a baby.
  • Mr. Jones is going to leave the firm.
2 added 295 characters in body
source | link

collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.

In my view Collins's two items (prediction and intention) do not cover all uses of gF (going future). They should have a third item

3 you use gF whenever you tell someone something new that has some importance.

  • Mary is going to have a baby.
  • Mr. Jones is going to leave the firm.

collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.

collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.

In my view Collins's two items (prediction and intention) do not cover all uses of gF (going future). They should have a third item

3 you use gF whenever you tell someone something new that has some importance.

  • Mary is going to have a baby.
  • Mr. Jones is going to leave the firm.
1
source | link

collinsdictionary.com says about "to be going to do":

used for

1 predictions: It's going to rain.

If someone predicts something he is rather sure about his prediction. "to be going to do" is compared to "will" a long formula and has much more weight than the short "will". So it is natural to use the longer formula when someone announces a prediction.

  1. for intentions: I going to sell my old car.

When used for intention this implies that you tell someone something new. And so it is natural that the longer formula with more weight is used.