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By definition of Cambridge Dictionaries Online

betterThe word 'better' means

   comparative of good: of a higher quality or more enjoyable than someone or something else

comparative of good: of a higher quality or more enjoyable than someone or something else

By most dictionaries, better offbetter off means better economically.

For example: "The better–off people live in the older section of town."

"The better–off people live in the older section of town."

By some dictionaries, better offbetter off can also mean the same as just betterthe word better

For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

"Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

So what's the difference between "better" and "better off"?

In what contexts would using "better off" be better(or better off) than just using "better"?

By definition of Cambridge Dictionaries Online

better means

   comparative of good: of a higher quality or more enjoyable than someone or something else

By most dictionaries, better off means better economically.

For example: "The better–off people live in the older section of town."

By some dictionaries, better off can also mean the same as just better

For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

So what's the difference between "better" and "better off"?

In what contexts would using "better off" be better(or better off) than just using "better"?

By definition of Cambridge Dictionaries Online

The word 'better' means

comparative of good: of a higher quality or more enjoyable than someone or something else

By most dictionaries, better off means better economically.

For example:

"The better–off people live in the older section of town."

By some dictionaries, better off can also mean the same as just the word better

For example:

"Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

So what's the difference between "better" and "better off"?

In what contexts would using "better off" be better(or better off) than just using "better"?

1
source | link

How is "better off" different from just "better"?

By definition of Cambridge Dictionaries Online

better means

   comparative of good: of a higher quality or more enjoyable than someone or something else

By most dictionaries, better off means better economically.

For example: "The better–off people live in the older section of town."

By some dictionaries, better off can also mean the same as just better

For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

So what's the difference between "better" and "better off"?

In what contexts would using "better off" be better(or better off) than just using "better"?