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For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

It would sound slightly awkward to leave out the "off" in this case. Saying "better" without the "off" would almost imply that he was making you physically sick, and that you will feel better when you he's out of your life. "Better off" implies that the state of your life will be better when he is no longer in it, and that's probably what you intend here.

"better off" is generally used in 2 distinct cases:

  1. as an idiomatic synonym for "richer" ("Jack is better off than Joe")
  2. when you are comparing choices someone could make or has made ("better off without her"; "better off leaving"; "better off just giving up"; etc). In all these cases there are, at least implicitly, two options, and you are saying that the person will be in a better state if he or she chooses one.

For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

It would sound slightly awkward to leave out the "off" in this case. Saying "better" without the "off" would almost imply that he was making you physically sick, and that you will feel better when you he's out of your life. "Better off" implies that the state of your life will be better when he is no longer in it, and that's probably what you intend here.

"better off" is generally used in 2 distinct cases:

  1. as an idiomatic synonym for "richer" ("Jack is better off than Joe")
  2. when you are comparing choices someone could make ("better off without her"; "better off leaving"; "better off just giving up"; etc). In all these cases there are, at least implicitly, two options, and you saying that the person will be in a better state if he or she chooses one.

For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

It would sound slightly awkward to leave out the "off" in this case. Saying "better" without the "off" would almost imply that he was making you physically sick, and that you will feel better when you he's out of your life. "Better off" implies that the state of your life will be better when he is no longer in it, and that's probably what you intend here.

"better off" is generally used in 2 distinct cases:

  1. as an idiomatic synonym for "richer" ("Jack is better off than Joe")
  2. when you are comparing choices someone could make or has made ("better off without her"; "better off leaving"; "better off just giving up"; etc). In all these cases there are, at least implicitly, two options, and you are saying that the person will be in a better state if he or she chooses one.
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For example: "Steve’s an idiot – you’d be better off without him."

In this example above, better off is used just like better. Am I right?

It would sound slightly awkward to leave out the "off" in this case. Saying "better" without the "off" would almost imply that he was making you physically sick, and that you will feel better when you he's out of your life. "Better off" implies that the state of your life will be better when he is no longer in it, and that's probably what you intend here.

"better off" is generally used in 2 distinct cases:

  1. as an idiomatic synonym for "richer" ("Jack is better off than Joe")
  2. when you are comparing choices someone could make ("better off without her"; "better off leaving"; "better off just giving up"; etc). In all these cases there are, at least implicitly, two options, and you saying that the person will be in a better state if he or she chooses one.