7 edited tags
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6 removing references to ungrammatical "tired to" sentences; hoping to keep the main question as clear as possible
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This is grammatical:

I'm too tired to drive.

but this isn't:

I'm tired to drive.

Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical?

In a sentence like “He slowly walked down the street”, you can remove the adverb and still get a grammatical sentence: “He walked down the street.” What is different about “I'm too tired to drive”?


I have also often come across such constructions as:

I am tired to do that
I am tired to please them
I am tired to lose the championship at the last race; it has happened too many times in the last years

Are these ungrammatical?

This is grammatical:

I'm too tired to drive.

but this isn't:

I'm tired to drive.

Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical?

In a sentence like “He slowly walked down the street”, you can remove the adverb and still get a grammatical sentence: “He walked down the street.” What is different about “I'm too tired to drive”?


I have also often come across such constructions as:

I am tired to do that
I am tired to please them
I am tired to lose the championship at the last race; it has happened too many times in the last years

Are these ungrammatical?

This is grammatical:

I'm too tired to drive.

but this isn't:

I'm tired to drive.

Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical?

In a sentence like “He slowly walked down the street”, you can remove the adverb and still get a grammatical sentence: “He walked down the street.” What is different about “I'm too tired to drive”?

5 Made the title a little more learner-friendly
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“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing the adverb'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

4 rewrote to clarify the main question
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3 new tag: phrasal-adjective; clarified title
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    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackEnglishLL/status/542963428005253120
2 added 393 characters in body
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