2 added 7 characters in body
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  1. If I was back at home right now, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna.

  2. If Barbara was any taller, she'd be too big for the car

  3. If I were back at home right now, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna right now.

  4. If Barbara were taller, she'd be even scariertoo big for the car!

In old-fashioned, prescriptive grammars, people used to say that we should always use were in these types of conditional, for both first and third person singular, as in examples (3) and (4).

However, we now know that this is not a grammar rule of English. It is not even a good style rule. The best and most famous writers in English have always used both was and were for the first and third persons, as in examples (1) and (2).

There are, however, some fixed phrases where writers have consistently used were. The best known example is in the fixed phrase:

  • If I were you, ...

However, in actual speech, not writing, If I was you is actually extremely common. It is only in written English that we almost exclusively use were in this phrase.

Hope this is helpful!

  1. If I was back at home right now, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna.

  2. If Barbara was any taller, she'd be too big for the car

  3. If I were back at home, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna right now.

  4. If Barbara were taller, she'd be even scarier!

In old-fashioned, prescriptive grammars, people used to say that we should always use were in these types of conditional, for both first and third person singular, as in examples (3) and (4).

However, we now know that this is not a grammar rule of English. It is not even a good style rule. The best and most famous writers in English have always used both was and were for the first and third persons, as in examples (1) and (2).

There are, however, some fixed phrases where writers have consistently used were. The best known example is in the fixed phrase:

  • If I were you, ...

However, in actual speech, not writing, If I was you is actually extremely common. It is only in written English that we almost exclusively use were in this phrase.

Hope this is helpful!

  1. If I was back at home right now, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna.

  2. If Barbara was any taller, she'd be too big for the car

  3. If I were back at home right now, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna.

  4. If Barbara were taller, she'd be too big for the car!

In old-fashioned, prescriptive grammars, people used to say that we should always use were in these types of conditional, for both first and third person singular, as in examples (3) and (4).

However, we now know that this is not a grammar rule of English. It is not even a good style rule. The best and most famous writers in English have always used both was and were for the first and third persons, as in examples (1) and (2).

There are, however, some fixed phrases where writers have consistently used were. The best known example is in the fixed phrase:

  • If I were you, ...

However, in actual speech, not writing, If I was you is actually extremely common. It is only in written English that we almost exclusively use were in this phrase.

Hope this is helpful!

1
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  1. If I was back at home right now, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna.

  2. If Barbara was any taller, she'd be too big for the car

  3. If I were back at home, I'd be eating my wife's lasagna right now.

  4. If Barbara were taller, she'd be even scarier!

In old-fashioned, prescriptive grammars, people used to say that we should always use were in these types of conditional, for both first and third person singular, as in examples (3) and (4).

However, we now know that this is not a grammar rule of English. It is not even a good style rule. The best and most famous writers in English have always used both was and were for the first and third persons, as in examples (1) and (2).

There are, however, some fixed phrases where writers have consistently used were. The best known example is in the fixed phrase:

  • If I were you, ...

However, in actual speech, not writing, If I was you is actually extremely common. It is only in written English that we almost exclusively use were in this phrase.

Hope this is helpful!