4 edited tags; edited title
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anyone "Anyone have an extra apartment there?"

3 Providing a real world example
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Anyone have an extra apartment there?

This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"?

This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an affirmative sentence as in:

Anyone knows what happened?

Here is the full quote:

Friends. Hi! Sitting here on a Friday night brainstorming honeymoon options with David. Who has ideas?!? Where is a great place to visit at the end of March? We have ideas all over the place. One option we are thinking about Paris ... anyone have an extra apartment there?

If it is an elliptical question, what do you think is more common in everyday spoken English? Elliptical or questions in affirmative forms?

Edit:

Thanks to everyone for answering. I was looking for the full meaning and etymology of an idiom when I came across this quote which serves as a real world example:

In Reply to: (Correcting omission) posted by R. Berg on February 25, 2003

: : : Anyone know the origin of the idiom or phrase "Throw the book at em." I realize it means prosecute someone to the fullest extent of the law, a law enforcement term, but does anyone really know where it came from and when it first began being used?

Anyone have an extra apartment there?

This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"?

This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an affirmative sentence as in:

Anyone knows what happened?

Here is the full quote:

Friends. Hi! Sitting here on a Friday night brainstorming honeymoon options with David. Who has ideas?!? Where is a great place to visit at the end of March? We have ideas all over the place. One option we are thinking about Paris ... anyone have an extra apartment there?

If it is an elliptical question, what do you think is more common in everyday spoken English? Elliptical or questions in affirmative forms?

Anyone have an extra apartment there?

This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"?

This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an affirmative sentence as in:

Anyone knows what happened?

Here is the full quote:

Friends. Hi! Sitting here on a Friday night brainstorming honeymoon options with David. Who has ideas?!? Where is a great place to visit at the end of March? We have ideas all over the place. One option we are thinking about Paris ... anyone have an extra apartment there?

If it is an elliptical question, what do you think is more common in everyday spoken English? Elliptical or questions in affirmative forms?

Edit:

Thanks to everyone for answering. I was looking for the full meaning and etymology of an idiom when I came across this quote which serves as a real world example:

In Reply to: (Correcting omission) posted by R. Berg on February 25, 2003

: : : Anyone know the origin of the idiom or phrase "Throw the book at em." I realize it means prosecute someone to the fullest extent of the law, a law enforcement term, but does anyone really know where it came from and when it first began being used?

2 moved quote from title to body of question
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Anyone have an extra apartment there?

This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"? This

This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an affirmative sentence as in:

Anyone knows what happened?

TheHere is the full quote:

Friends. Hi! Sitting here on a Friday night brainstorming honeymoon options with David. Who has ideas?!? Where is a great place to visit at the end of March? We have ideas all over the place. One option we are thinking about Paris ... anyone have an extra apartment there?

If it is an elliptical question, what do you think is more common in everyday spoken English? Elliptical or questions in affirmative forms?

This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"? This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an affirmative sentence as in:

Anyone knows what happened?

The quote

Friends. Hi! Sitting here on a Friday night brainstorming honeymoon options with David. Who has ideas?!? Where is a great place to visit at the end of March? We have ideas all over the place. One option we are thinking about Paris ... anyone have an extra apartment there?

If it is an elliptical question, what do you think is more common in everyday spoken English? Elliptical or questions in affirmative forms?

Anyone have an extra apartment there?

This quote is from an English native speaker. Why "anyone have"?

This could be an elliptical question, but I'd expect native speakers to ask a question using an affirmative sentence as in:

Anyone knows what happened?

Here is the full quote:

Friends. Hi! Sitting here on a Friday night brainstorming honeymoon options with David. Who has ideas?!? Where is a great place to visit at the end of March? We have ideas all over the place. One option we are thinking about Paris ... anyone have an extra apartment there?

If it is an elliptical question, what do you think is more common in everyday spoken English? Elliptical or questions in affirmative forms?

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