3 added 119 characters in body
source | link

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off anything atelementsat the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the contextcontext—primarily function words, "articles, dummies, auxiliaries, possessives, conditional if, and ... subject pronouns". In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off anything at the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the context. In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off elementsat the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the context—primarily function words, "articles, dummies, auxiliaries, possessives, conditional if, and ... subject pronouns". In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.

2 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
source | link

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELUELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off anything at the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the context. In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off anything at the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the context. In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off anything at the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the context. In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.

1
source | link

This is conversational deletion, which John Lawler has addressed on ELU.

Briefly, this is a 'rule' of conversational English which says that a speaker can chop off anything at the beginning of an utterance which may be inferred from the context. In your example:

Does anyone have an extra apartment there?

Have stays in the infinitive, because the does is inferred. This might also be expressed

Has anyone got an extra apartment there?

If the subject is inferrable, that can go, too:

Have you got a spare pen?
Will you have a drink?

But as Prof. Lawler says,

this phenomenon only occurs in speaking English, and in other informal communication systems like email and txting that work like speech. It is not good formal written style, except for reporting dialog in a story.