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The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about or spoken to, or between the person or thing spoken about and other persons (or things) to whom he or she (or it) might be compared.

He had a great baritone voice. We won't hear the likes of it again any time soon.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.

The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about or spoken to.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.

The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about or spoken to, or between the person or thing spoken about and other persons (or things) to whom he or she (or it) might be compared.

He had a great baritone voice. We won't hear the likes of it again any time soon.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.

2 added 13 characters in body
source | link

The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about or spoken to.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.

The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.

The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about or spoken to.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.

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source | link

The phrase 'the likes of' has a pejorative connotation fairly often, but not always. But the phrase always draws attention to a stark difference between the speaker (or "us") and the person(s) spoken about.

Why are you dating the likes of him? He's been in and out of juvy since he was 13.

Consider this review of a collection of poetry called The Likes of Us, where the lines of the poems are compared to "shady characters" (shady=disreputable).

Wright's English Dialect Dictionary shows examples of non-pejorative uses:

It's all very well for the likes of you, but poor men can't afford it.

There, the difference between the speaker and the person spoken to is being emphasized. "You" there is not a "shady character" but someone who has much more wealth than the speaker.