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The question may arise why "will not" is contracted to "won't" and not to "willn't/ wiln't/win't". The /i/ in "will" is a secondary sound, the primary sound was o as we see in Latin vole:re (infinitive, to will/modal verb will). The present tense of volere has vowel change due to endings with i.

Latin vol-o - I will

Latin vis - you will (vis contracted from *vol-is. The form was used so frequently that it was rapidly shortened.)

We see this vowel change also in German: wollen - wir/sie wollen - ihr wollt - infinitive - we/they will - you will, plural but

ich will - du willst - I will - you will, singular.

I didn't check how things were in Old English. It would be interesting to see whether there are forms with o such as woll to be found and when secondary forms with i occurred.

The o is also in volition.

The question may arise why "will not" is contracted to "won't" and not to "willn't/ wiln't/win't". The /i/ in "will" is a secondary sound, the primary sound was o as we see in Latin vole:re (infinitive, to will/modal verb will). The present tense of volere has vowel change due to endings with i.

Latin vol-o - I will

Latin vis - you will (vis contracted from *vol-is. The form was used so frequently that it was rapidly shortened.)

We see this vowel change also in German: wollen - wir/sie wollen - ihr wollt - infinitive - we/they will - you will, plural but

ich will - du willst - I will - you will, singular.

I didn't check how things were in Old English. It would be interesting to see whether there are forms with o such as woll to be found and when secondary forms with i occurred.

The question may arise why "will not" is contracted to "won't" and not to "willn't/ wiln't/win't". The /i/ in "will" is a secondary sound, the primary sound was o as we see in Latin vole:re (infinitive, to will/modal verb will). The present tense of volere has vowel change due to endings with i.

Latin vol-o - I will

Latin vis - you will (vis contracted from *vol-is. The form was used so frequently that it was rapidly shortened.)

We see this vowel change also in German: wollen - wir/sie wollen - ihr wollt - infinitive - we/they will - you will, plural but

ich will - du willst - I will - you will, singular.

I didn't check how things were in Old English. It would be interesting to see whether there are forms with o such as woll to be found and when secondary forms with i occurred.

The o is also in volition.

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The question may arise why "will not" is contracted to "won't" and not to "willn't/ wiln't/win't". The /i/ in "will" is a secondary sound, the primary sound was o as we see in Latin vole:re (infinitive, to will/modal verb will). The present tense of volere has vowel change due to endings with i.

Latin vol-o - I will

Latin vis - you will (vis contracted from *vol-is. The form was used so frequently that it was rapidly shortened.)

We see this vowel change also in German: wollen - wir/sie wollen - ihr wollt - infinitive - we/they will - you will, plural but

ich will - du willst - I will - you will, singular.

I didn't check how things were in Old English. It would be interesting to see whether there are forms with o such as woll to be found and when secondary forms with i occurred.