2 Deleted extra word.
source | link

Shortchange or short-change are more usual ways of writing this today.

It means, literally, to give someone less change than they are due: for instance, if you tender a $1 bill for an item costing $0.59, and I give you only $0.31 in change, I have shortchanged you by $0.10.

But the word is more commonly used in a figurative sense, as it is here: the author is telling you to speak honestly about the actual value which your competitors provide and not give them avoid less credit or respect than they are due.

See for example Collins.

Shortchange or short-change are more usual ways of writing this today.

It means, literally, to give someone less change than they are due: for instance, if you tender a $1 bill for an item costing $0.59, and I give you only $0.31 in change, I have shortchanged you by $0.10.

But the word is more commonly used in a figurative sense, as it is here: the author is telling you to speak honestly about the actual value which your competitors provide and not give them avoid less credit or respect than they are due.

See for example Collins.

Shortchange or short-change are more usual ways of writing this today.

It means, literally, to give someone less change than they are due: for instance, if you tender a $1 bill for an item costing $0.59, and I give you only $0.31 in change, I have shortchanged you by $0.10.

But the word is more commonly used in a figurative sense, as it is here: the author is telling you to speak honestly about the actual value which your competitors provide and not give them less credit or respect than they are due.

See for example Collins.

1
source | link

Shortchange or short-change are more usual ways of writing this today.

It means, literally, to give someone less change than they are due: for instance, if you tender a $1 bill for an item costing $0.59, and I give you only $0.31 in change, I have shortchanged you by $0.10.

But the word is more commonly used in a figurative sense, as it is here: the author is telling you to speak honestly about the actual value which your competitors provide and not give them avoid less credit or respect than they are due.

See for example Collins.