3 diaresis --> dieresis
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It's called a diaresisdieresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a diaresisdieresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "loop". Again, I've never written it with the diaresisdieresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.

It's called a diaresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a diaresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "loop". Again, I've never written it with the diaresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.

It's called a dieresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a dieresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "loop". Again, I've never written it with the dieresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.

2 Changed phonetic example, as per suggestion by @SPRBRN
source | link

It's called a diaresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a diaresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "soup""loop". Again, I've never written it with the diaresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.

It's called a diaresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a diaresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "soup". Again, I've never written it with the diaresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.

It's called a diaresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a diaresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "loop". Again, I've never written it with the diaresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.

1
source | link

It's called a diaresis. It's used to show that the "a" and the "i" are not to be pronounced as a single sound. So it's pronounced something like "na-eve" and not like "knave" or with the "ai" rhyming with the "i" in "knives".

But in 50 years as a native English speaker/writer, I have never written it like that, and have rarely seen it so either.

Another example is "cooperative" where the second "o" in theory has a diaresis. It's pronounced "coh-op...." and not to rhyme with "soup". Again, I've never written it with the diaresis, and don't recall seeing it like that either.