2 added 6 characters in body
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You seem to be mixing up two rules here.

We use an instead of a when the next word starts with a vowel sound. Indeed, 'a ear' would sound clumsy, so we say 'an ear'.

We do not use an instead of the; the English have no problem at all saying 'The ice is thick' or 'The ears of a cat are fluffy' (in fact, I would be hard-pressed to find a sentence with 'an ice' in it, since 'ice' is a mass noun).

The distinction between a / an and the is well explained in the other answers.

You seem to be mixing up two rules here.

We use an instead of a when the next word starts with a vowel. Indeed, 'a ear' would sound clumsy, so we say 'an ear'.

We do not use an instead of the; the English have no problem at all saying 'The ice is thick' or 'The ears of a cat are fluffy' (in fact, I would be hard-pressed to find a sentence with 'an ice' in it, since 'ice' is a mass noun).

The distinction between a / an and the is well explained in the other answers.

You seem to be mixing up two rules here.

We use an instead of a when the next word starts with a vowel sound. Indeed, 'a ear' would sound clumsy, so we say 'an ear'.

We do not use an instead of the; the English have no problem at all saying 'The ice is thick' or 'The ears of a cat are fluffy' (in fact, I would be hard-pressed to find a sentence with 'an ice' in it, since 'ice' is a mass noun).

The distinction between a / an and the is well explained in the other answers.

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You seem to be mixing up two rules here.

We use an instead of a when the next word starts with a vowel. Indeed, 'a ear' would sound clumsy, so we say 'an ear'.

We do not use an instead of the; the English have no problem at all saying 'The ice is thick' or 'The ears of a cat are fluffy' (in fact, I would be hard-pressed to find a sentence with 'an ice' in it, since 'ice' is a mass noun).

The distinction between a / an and the is well explained in the other answers.