added 399 characters in body
Source Link
StoneyB on hiatus
  • 173k
  • 13
  • 254
  • 448
  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.source

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds. How do we do it? just means "How is it that we always manage to get ourselves in this situation?"

The earliest use I have found is in The M. K. & T. Employes' Magazine for March, 1917, where it is described as an 'old saying'.

  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.source

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds.

  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.source

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds. How do we do it? just means "How is it that we always manage to get ourselves in this situation?"

The earliest use I have found is in The M. K. & T. Employes' Magazine for March, 1917, where it is described as an 'old saying'.

added 267 characters in body
Source Link
StoneyB on hiatus
  • 173k
  • 13
  • 254
  • 448
  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.source

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds.

  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds.

  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.source

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds.

Source Link
StoneyB on hiatus
  • 173k
  • 13
  • 254
  • 448

  1. As TRomano observes, the keys worn by the innkeeper on his belt at one time signaled his sexual predilections to those in the know—worn on the left they designated a "top", one who took a more active role, worn on the right a "bottom", one who took a more passive role.

  2. As FumbleFingers points out, Block's line quotes an old ad for Salem cigarettes, which is itself based on the template Axelrod cites. Probably the best-known version of the template, and perhaps its origin, is "You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy".

  3. Lawrence Block has lived in the "West Village" (a part of New York City's Greenwich Village) for decades. At the time he settled there it was the "bohemian" district of the city, famous for its jazz and comedy clubs, and one of the centers of the not-very-far-underground homosexual culture—Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn are located there.

So Block is observing, with a touch of exasperation, that even across the Atlantic in Spain he cannot entirely escape the culture of his own stomping grounds.