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In my experience (AmE) the two most common expressions are

Give me a boost.

and

Give me a leg up.

Either of these can also be used figuratively - Job re-training programs for the unemployed are designed to give them a leg up in life. If you are looking for ways to improve your English, regular conversations with native speakers can give you a boost.

When used figuratively, giving a leg up may imply a little more help and impact on the recipient than giving them a boost. In the literal usage that you described, they seem equivalent to my ear.

Another difference between the literal and figurative uses is that in literal uses, the implication is that the assistor is at the level of the person being assisted and is helping them get to some higher level. In figurative uses, the assistor may start at a higher status and give someone a boost/leg up to help them catch up.

In my experience (AmE) the two most common expressions are

Give me a boost.

and

Give me a leg up.

Either of these can also be used figuratively - Job re-training programs for the unemployed are designed to give them a leg up in life. If you are looking for ways to improve your English, regular conversations with native speakers can give you a boost.

When used figuratively, giving a leg up may imply a little more help and impact on the recipient than giving them a boost. In the literal usage that you described, they seem equivalent to my ear.

In my experience (AmE) the two most common expressions are

Give me a boost.

and

Give me a leg up.

Either of these can also be used figuratively - Job re-training programs for the unemployed are designed to give them a leg up in life. If you are looking for ways to improve your English, regular conversations with native speakers can give you a boost.

When used figuratively, giving a leg up may imply a little more help and impact on the recipient than giving them a boost. In the literal usage that you described, they seem equivalent to my ear.

Another difference between the literal and figurative uses is that in literal uses, the implication is that the assistor is at the level of the person being assisted and is helping them get to some higher level. In figurative uses, the assistor may start at a higher status and give someone a boost/leg up to help them catch up.

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In my experience (AmE) the two most common expressions are

Give me a boost.

and

Give me a leg up.

Either of these can also be used figuratively - Job re-training programs for the unemployed are designed to give them a leg up in life. If you are looking for ways to improve your English, regular conversations with native speakers can give you a boost.

When used figuratively, giving a leg up may imply a little more help and impact on the recipient than giving them a boost. In the literal usage that you described, they seem equivalent to my ear.