5 Rollback to Revision 3
source | link

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum.ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a beaurocratbureaucrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point, at all.

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a beaurocrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point, at all.

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a bureaucrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point at all.

4 Rollback to Revision 1
source | link

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum.ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a bureaucratbeaurocrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point, at all.

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a bureaucrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point at all.

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a beaurocrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point, at all.

3 Donning my foreign-language-goes-in-italics Nazi helmet.
source | link

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum.ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a beaurocratbureaucrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point at all.

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a beaurocrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point at all.

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. The application is slightly derogatory but not vulgar.

In many cases, the term is used when a referee or a bureaucrat makes a call and, while being correct rule-wise, they miss the point of the system that the said rule is made to support.

The result of such call or decision may vary from non-essential, insignificant changes up to a totally weird and unintended destruction of the greater good.

Is there a term like that in English? My google-fu gave me Jack-in-office but when I wrote that to a friend, they didn't get the point at all.

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackEnglishLL/status/599704207625736194
2 Added "translation" tag.
source | link
1
source | link