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You usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, StoneyB, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence " I have been swimming" indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. It'sIts use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.

You usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, StoneyB, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence " I have been swimming" indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. It's use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.

You usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, StoneyB, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence " I have been swimming" indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. Its use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.

2 added 35 characters in body
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ToYou usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, StoneyB, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence indicates" I have been swimming" indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. It's use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.

To usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. It's use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.

You usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, StoneyB, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence " I have been swimming" indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. It's use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.

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To usually use the present perfect for recent actions that have results in the present. In light of this description and the answer of our respectable teacher, I think the use of the present perfect in the sentence under discussion is more appropriate. As Americans also use the past simple in this situation, you can use either the past simple or the present perfect in this sentence.

As for the present perfect continuous, it indicates an ongoing action; the action that started in the past and still continues in the present.

As the mother's action (pushing her daughter) is an ongoing action, the use of the present perfect continuous is also correct grammatically.

Besides, you can sometimes use the present perfect continuous to replace the present perfect to imply a recently completed action in addition to its normal sense of an ongoing action. Please look at the following sentences:

He said, "Why are you so wet". "I have been swimming", she replied.

The sentence indicates the action recently completed.

So you can say "But that's because I have pushed you/have been pushing you to do something".

The adverb always is used to imply at all times, repeatedly, continually, etc. It's use in a sentence doesn't mean that the sentence is in the continuous form.