The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
3 added 1 character in body
source | link

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all (unless- unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.


EDIT: In all fairness, to whom it may concern is so well-known almost every native speaker would probably notice if you switched to who there. But if you ask To who am I speaking?, I doubt the average telephone receptionist would notice anything wrong (or unusual - it happens all the time).

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all (unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.


EDIT: In all fairness, to whom it may concern is so well-known almost every native speaker would probably notice if you switched to who there. But if you ask To who am I speaking?, I doubt the average telephone receptionist would notice anything wrong (or unusual - it happens all the time).

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all - unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.


EDIT: In all fairness, to whom it may concern is so well-known almost every native speaker would probably notice if you switched to who there. But if you ask To who am I speaking?, I doubt the average telephone receptionist would notice anything wrong (or unusual - it happens all the time).

2 added 312 characters in body
source | link

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all (unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.


EDIT: In all fairness, to whom it may concern is so well-known almost every native speaker would probably notice if you switched to who there. But if you ask To who am I speaking?, I doubt the average telephone receptionist would notice anything wrong (or unusual - it happens all the time).

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all (unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all (unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.


EDIT: In all fairness, to whom it may concern is so well-known almost every native speaker would probably notice if you switched to who there. But if you ask To who am I speaking?, I doubt the average telephone receptionist would notice anything wrong (or unusual - it happens all the time).

1
source | link

I agree with @TRomano that whom will continue to "function" for at least a few more generations. So if you use it correctly, it's quite okay to carry on.

You can even get away with using in wrongly sometimes. Not all native speakers will recognize every misuse (they might just assume you know better! :)

But definitely the easiest option is not to bother with it at all (unless you're certain it's correct, in which case it's really just a judgement call/style choice.