2 replaced http://ell.stackexchange.com/ with https://ell.stackexchange.com/
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As you present these sentences, there is no reason for preferring the perfect to the simple past. That being the case, I recommend that you follow what I call FumbleFingers' Perfect TruismFumbleFingers' Perfect Truism, which may be generalized as:

Don't use the Perfect unless you really have to.

It is however possible to imagine circumstances in which you should prefer the perfect:

A: Is Bob going to send you the two books he promised?
B: He has already sent me the book he has read, but he won't send the other one until has finished it.

Here you are speaking of the present result of his reading: having read it, he no longer needs it and therefore has sent it.

As you present these sentences, there is no reason for preferring the perfect to the simple past. That being the case, I recommend that you follow what I call FumbleFingers' Perfect Truism, which may be generalized as:

Don't use the Perfect unless you really have to.

It is however possible to imagine circumstances in which you should prefer the perfect:

A: Is Bob going to send you the two books he promised?
B: He has already sent me the book he has read, but he won't send the other one until has finished it.

Here you are speaking of the present result of his reading: having read it, he no longer needs it and therefore has sent it.

As you present these sentences, there is no reason for preferring the perfect to the simple past. That being the case, I recommend that you follow what I call FumbleFingers' Perfect Truism, which may be generalized as:

Don't use the Perfect unless you really have to.

It is however possible to imagine circumstances in which you should prefer the perfect:

A: Is Bob going to send you the two books he promised?
B: He has already sent me the book he has read, but he won't send the other one until has finished it.

Here you are speaking of the present result of his reading: having read it, he no longer needs it and therefore has sent it.

1
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As you present these sentences, there is no reason for preferring the perfect to the simple past. That being the case, I recommend that you follow what I call FumbleFingers' Perfect Truism, which may be generalized as:

Don't use the Perfect unless you really have to.

It is however possible to imagine circumstances in which you should prefer the perfect:

A: Is Bob going to send you the two books he promised?
B: He has already sent me the book he has read, but he won't send the other one until has finished it.

Here you are speaking of the present result of his reading: having read it, he no longer needs it and therefore has sent it.