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If the sentence in the singular is:

The butcher's and the hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

What happens to the genitive if I want to make it plural?

  1. ButchersButcher's and hairdressershairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

  2. Butchers' and hairdressers' are closed on Sunday.

  3. Butcher's shops and hairdresser's salons are closed on Sunday.

In British English they call it the butcher's, because "shop" can stay implicit. My question is: if I want to say all the butcher's shops are closed, can I still leave the word "shop" implicit and therefore say: Butchers'Butcher's are closed on Sunday? Meaning "butcher's shops"? Why would I loose the genitive in the plural if I had it in the singular? If I drop the apostrophe and I say the butchers (plural) does it wouldnot mean the butchers = the people who work in those shops.?

If the sentence in the singular is:

The butcher's and the hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

What happens to the genitive if I want to make it plural?

  1. Butchers and hairdressers are closed on Sunday.

  2. Butchers' and hairdressers' are closed on Sunday.

  3. Butcher's shops and hairdresser's salons are closed on Sunday.

In British English they call it the butcher's, because "shop" can stay implicit. My question is: if I want to say all the butcher's shops are closed, can I still leave the word "shop" implicit and therefore say: Butchers' are closed on Sunday? Why would I loose the genitive in the plural if I had it in the singular? If I drop the apostrophe and I say the butchers (plural) it would mean the butchers = the people who work in those shops.

If the sentence in the singular is:

The butcher's and the hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

What happens to the genitive if I want to make it plural?

  1. Butcher's and hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

  2. Butchers' and hairdressers' are closed on Sunday.

  3. Butcher's shops and hairdresser's salons are closed on Sunday.

In British English they call it the butcher's, because "shop" can stay implicit. My question is: if I want to say all the butcher's shops are closed, can I still leave the word "shop" implicit and therefore say: Butcher's are closed on Sunday? Meaning "butcher's shops"? Why would I loose the genitive in the plural if I had it in the singular? If I drop the apostrophe and I say the butchers (plural) does it not mean the butchers = the people who work in those shops?

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If the sentence in the singular is:

The butcher's and the hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

What happens to the genitive if I want to make it plural?

  1. Butchers and hairdressers are closed on Sunday.

  2. Butchers' and hairdressers' are closed on Sunday.

  3. Butcher's shops and hairdresser's salons are closed on Sunday.

In British English they call it the butcher's, because "shop" can stay implicit. My question is: if I want to say all the butcher's shops are closed, can I still leave the word "shop" implicit and therefore say: Butchers' are closed on Sunday? Why would I loose the genitive in the plural if I had it in the singular? If I drop the apostrophe and I say the butchers (plural) it would mean the butchers = the people who work in those shops.

If the sentence in the singular is:

The butcher's and the hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

What happens to the genitive if I want to make it plural?

  1. Butchers and hairdressers are closed on Sunday.

  2. Butchers' and hairdressers' are closed on Sunday.

  3. Butcher's shops and hairdresser's salons are closed on Sunday.

If the sentence in the singular is:

The butcher's and the hairdresser's are closed on Sunday.

What happens to the genitive if I want to make it plural?

  1. Butchers and hairdressers are closed on Sunday.

  2. Butchers' and hairdressers' are closed on Sunday.

  3. Butcher's shops and hairdresser's salons are closed on Sunday.

In British English they call it the butcher's, because "shop" can stay implicit. My question is: if I want to say all the butcher's shops are closed, can I still leave the word "shop" implicit and therefore say: Butchers' are closed on Sunday? Why would I loose the genitive in the plural if I had it in the singular? If I drop the apostrophe and I say the butchers (plural) it would mean the butchers = the people who work in those shops.

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