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Cerberus
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It is very casual and informal. When in doubt, I recommend that you do not use it. It is quite different from Italian or Spanish, where subject pronouns can be left out; in English (and other Germanic languages), it is unusual. I would interpret it as follows:

  1. You are in a hurry or working on an awkward keyboard;

  2. Or this text is not important;

  3. Or you are consciously mimicking a casual, conversational style.

Because journals (not academic journals, but logbooks) and diaries are to be considered one's own notes and regularly written in a hurry, people may leave out subject pronouns more often in those genres. For that reason, omitting subject pronouns has come to evoke a journalling style.

In many genres of texts, it is considered bad style, unless it is part of a rendered dialogue that is meant to sound colloquial. So I wouldn't use it in a novel, a newspaper article, an academic paper, an e-mail to a stranger, ornor in most other genres.

It is very casual and informal. When in doubt, I recommend that you do not use it. It is quite different from Italian or Spanish, where subject pronouns can be left out; in English (and other Germanic languages), it is unusual. I would interpret it as follows:

  1. You are in a hurry or working on an awkward keyboard;

  2. Or this text is not important;

  3. Or you are consciously mimicking a casual, conversational style.

Because journals (not academic journals, but logbooks) and diaries are to be considered one's own notes and regularly written in a hurry, people may leave out subject pronouns more often in those genres. For that reason, omitting subject pronouns has come to evoke a journalling style.

In many genres of texts, it is considered bad style, unless it is part of a rendered dialogue that is meant to sound colloquial. So I wouldn't use it in a novel, a newspaper article, an academic paper, an e-mail to a stranger, or in most other genres.

It is very casual and informal. When in doubt, I recommend that you do not use it. It is quite different from Italian or Spanish, where subject pronouns can be left out; in English (and other Germanic languages), it is unusual. I would interpret it as follows:

  1. You are in a hurry or working on an awkward keyboard;

  2. Or this text is not important;

  3. Or you are consciously mimicking a casual, conversational style.

Because journals (not academic journals, but logbooks) and diaries are to be considered one's own notes and regularly written in a hurry, people may leave out subject pronouns more often in those genres. For that reason, omitting subject pronouns has come to evoke a journalling style.

In many genres of texts, it is considered bad style, unless it is part of a dialogue that is meant to sound colloquial. So I wouldn't use it in a novel, a newspaper article, an academic paper, an e-mail to a stranger, nor in most other genres.

Source Link
Cerberus
  • 5k
  • 1
  • 18
  • 25

It is very casual and informal. When in doubt, I recommend that you do not use it. It is quite different from Italian or Spanish, where subject pronouns can be left out; in English (and other Germanic languages), it is unusual. I would interpret it as follows:

  1. You are in a hurry or working on an awkward keyboard;

  2. Or this text is not important;

  3. Or you are consciously mimicking a casual, conversational style.

Because journals (not academic journals, but logbooks) and diaries are to be considered one's own notes and regularly written in a hurry, people may leave out subject pronouns more often in those genres. For that reason, omitting subject pronouns has come to evoke a journalling style.

In many genres of texts, it is considered bad style, unless it is part of a rendered dialogue that is meant to sound colloquial. So I wouldn't use it in a novel, a newspaper article, an academic paper, an e-mail to a stranger, or in most other genres.