6 replaced http://ell.stackexchange.com/ with https://ell.stackexchange.com/
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I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fitsown rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

5 deleted 155 characters in body
source | link

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

Another example with hers confused me further:

Anisya Fedorovna's smiling face reappeared in the doorway and behind hers other faces...

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

Another example with hers confused me further:

Anisya Fedorovna's smiling face reappeared in the doorway and behind hers other faces...

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

4 added 227 characters in body
source | link

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

Another example with hers confused me further:

Anisya Fedorovna's smiling face reappeared in the doorway and behind hers other faces...

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

I'm pretty clear about using subject or object version of pronouns.

While writing a line, I naturally wrote it in this way -

Your and my grandparents had grown listening to this piece of music.

But then, as I read, it looked incorrect. Then I tried this:

Yours and mine grandparents had grown . . . "

It looked even worse!

These are possessive cases, but still I'm confused what to use and why?

What confuses me is my own rule of breaking the sentence in two and decide what fits. If I break, it appears that . . . 

Your grandparents + my grandparents = *Your and my grandparents had . . . *

What if I use possessive pronoun 'yours' this way?

"The grandparents of yours and mine had grown up . . . "

'yours' is used when the speaker refers to 'your things'. But then this particular sentence is baffling me! Because I'm the speaker and the sentence includes my possession as well!


Okay, we have 'our' as 'you' and 'I', but then the question is about using proper pronouns.

What about this:

Your and her grandparents...

Or...

Yours and her grandparents...

O...

Yours and hers grandparents...

Another example with hers confused me further:

Anisya Fedorovna's smiling face reappeared in the doorway and behind hers other faces...

3 added 274 characters in body
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2 Correct ellipsis uses some spaces between the dots.
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