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When you use propositional phrases or conjunctive phrases, do you use a pronoun that matches your subject prior to mentioning the actual subject?

"II don't think you'll need her number, but Jennifer's number is x."

vs

 

"II don't think you'll need Jennifer's number, but her number is x."

And 

Although she is late, I think Jennifer will be here any minute now."

vs

 

Although Jennifer is late, I think she will be here any minute now."

When you use propositional phrases or conjunctive phrases, do you use a pronoun that matches your subject prior to mentioning the actual subject?

"I don't think you'll need her number, but Jennifer's number is x."

vs

"I don't think you'll need Jennifer's number, but her number is x."

And

Although she is late, I think Jennifer will be here any minute now."

vs

Although Jennifer is late, I think she will be here any minute now."

When you use propositional phrases or conjunctive phrases, do you use a pronoun that matches your subject prior to mentioning the actual subject?

I don't think you'll need her number, but Jennifer's number is x.

 

I don't think you'll need Jennifer's number, but her number is x.

 

Although she is late, I think Jennifer will be here any minute now.

 

Although Jennifer is late, I think she will be here any minute now.

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Pronoun first, then name?

When you use propositional phrases or conjunctive phrases, do you use a pronoun that matches your subject prior to mentioning the actual subject?

"I don't think you'll need her number, but Jennifer's number is x."

vs

"I don't think you'll need Jennifer's number, but her number is x."

And

Although she is late, I think Jennifer will be here any minute now."

vs

Although Jennifer is late, I think she will be here any minute now."