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Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to VERB is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of past instances of X VERBing. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.

X is known to VERB, in the present tense, has a somewhat different meaning: [somebody] possesses knowledge that X VERBs.

Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to VERB is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of past instances of X VERBing. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.

X is known to, in the present tense, has a somewhat different meaning: [somebody] possesses knowledge that X VERBs.

Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to VERB is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of past instances of X VERBing. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.

X is known to VERB, in the present tense, has a somewhat different meaning: [somebody] possesses knowledge that X VERBs.

2 added 141 characters in body
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Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to VERB is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of past instances of X VERBing. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.

X is known to, in the present tense, has a somewhat different meaning: [somebody] possesses knowledge that X VERBs.

Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of instances of X. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.

Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to VERB is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of past instances of X VERBing. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.

X is known to, in the present tense, has a somewhat different meaning: [somebody] possesses knowledge that X VERBs.

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Reference Time is ambiguous—it may refer to the time of writing Quidditch Through the Ages or it may refer to the time at which Harry read the work—but that particular sort of ambiguity is inherent when discussing written works. For practical purposes, RT may be taken to equate the two times, as if Harry in reading is 'listening to' the book.

So all the simple pasts occur in Harry's 'present', RT; the past perfects may represent either simple pasts (if the sense is perfective) or present perfects (if the sense is stative) in that time.

So what Harry reads is something like this

There are seven hundred ways of committing a Quidditch foul. All of them happened during a World Cup match in 1473. (The past perfect represents a backshifted simple past, referring to a completed event.)

Seekers are usually the smallest and fastest players, and most serious Quidditch accidents seem to happen to them.

People rarely die playing Quidditch, but referees have been known to vanish and turn up months later in the Sahara Desert. (The past perfect represents a backshifted present perfect representing a present state of knowledge.)

X has been known [by somebody] to is, as Michel Plungjan points out, an idiom with a stative sense, meaning approximately [somebody] possesses knowledge of instances of X. So that last clause means

... but there are cases on record of referees vanishing and turning up months later in the Sahara Desert.