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Dec 9 '15 at 14:33 comment added CowperKettle @arsast - if your TOEFL page is from this book, then it might be a typo, since the authors are not native English speakers. We've been discussing the question in the chat, and Damkerng found this excerpt from this book with your sentence.
Dec 9 '15 at 14:26 comment added CowperKettle @arsast - in this PDF from the NY Public Library, written apparently by a native English speaker, a similar sentence uses "a public health nurse" (see page 3).
Dec 9 '15 at 14:20 history edited CowperKettle CC BY-SA 3.0
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Dec 9 '15 at 14:14 comment added CowperKettle @arsast - good point! I'm at a loss. Maybe I've overlooked something.
Dec 9 '15 at 14:10 comment added stangdon Regarding omission of the definite article - we sometimes do that when something is a title, or treated like one. For example, "He is captain of the team", or "She is hostess of the party." When we elide the explanatory bit (of the team or of the party) we still omit the article. I don't have a good reference for this, though!
Dec 9 '15 at 14:09 comment added arsast Thank you very much for complete answer. It is very conclusive for me, but I have met the expression "Lillian D. Wald, public health nurse and __________, was born in Cincinnati Ohio, in 1867" in the TOEFL test. Are there any exceptions to this rule?
Dec 9 '15 at 14:08 history edited CowperKettle CC BY-SA 3.0
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Dec 9 '15 at 14:02 history edited CowperKettle CC BY-SA 3.0
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Dec 9 '15 at 13:51 history edited CowperKettle CC BY-SA 3.0
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Dec 9 '15 at 13:43 history answered CowperKettle CC BY-SA 3.0