3 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
source | link

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer:

"It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: http://english.stackexchange.com/a/158385https://english.stackexchange.com/a/158385

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer:

"It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: http://english.stackexchange.com/a/158385

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer:

"It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: https://english.stackexchange.com/a/158385

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.

    Post Closed as "duplicate" by ColleenV, Nathan Tuggy, Peter, user3169, Varun Nair of
2 Changed the link to go directly to the answer. Highlighted the answer in a blockquote. Changed the tag to double negation and grammaticality.
source | link

Are double negatives like 'he's never not been in the family' grammatically correct?

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer: "It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

"It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: "http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/158384/since-vs-ever-since"http://english.stackexchange.com/a/158385

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.

Are double negatives grammatically correct?

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer: "It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: "http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/158384/since-vs-ever-since"

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.

Are double negatives like 'he's never not been in the family' grammatically correct?

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer:

"It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: http://english.stackexchange.com/a/158385

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.

1
source | link

Are double negatives grammatically correct?

I'm asking this question because I was taught not to use double negatives, because they are ungrammatical and that people who use them sound uneducated. However, today here on this site I found an answer with a double negative and asked my self is it correct to use double negatives? Well my doubts arose since this answer has eight positive votes. Even though I understand the meaning of it, I still wonder if it is correct or not. Below is the answer I'm talking about as well is the link to it.

Answer: "It might add the subtle extra nuance of meaning that since you were born he's never not been in the family."

Link: "http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/158384/since-vs-ever-since"

P.S. Not trying to put this site and the people from it in doubt, just clarifying and making sure to learn well this beautiful language.