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In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what itis meant. Every native speaker would understand what is truly meant, but it is never taught as correct.

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant. Every native speaker would understand what is truly meant, but it is never taught as correct.

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what is meant. Every native speaker would understand what is truly meant, but it is never taught as correct.

4 added 94 characters in body
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In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant. Every native speaker would understand what is truly meant, but it is never taught as correct.

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant.

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant. Every native speaker would understand what is truly meant, but it is never taught as correct.

3 deleted 14 characters in body
source | link

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they actually they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant.

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they actually they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant.

In English (formal English anyway), double negatives have the same effect as they do in math: two negatives make a positive (i.e. -1 x -1 = 1).

So saying "he's never not been in the family" means "there has never been a time when he was not part of the family," or more simply, "he's always been in the family".

Used like that, it is grammaticality correct.

The cases that are ungrammatical and make people sound uneducated is when they use a double negative when they don't mean to make it positive. For example, "he ain't got no time". That sentence technically means "he has time", but that's not what it meant.

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