2 Changed part of answer after thinking about it overnight.
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[Edit: this sentence is wrong - see below] 'Might have you ...?' is (just) possible but is extremely rare (Google Ngram - by itself and with 'have you') and extremely awkward. [This sentence is still true] More natural questions are 'Might you possibly have read ...?' or 'Is is possible that you have read ...?'.

'Might you had ...' is grammatically incorrect. 'Might' (and all other modal verbs) must be followed by a verb in its base form - 'have', not 'has' or 'had' or 'having'.

Where did you read or hear these sentences, or did you write them yourself?

[Edit: I have thought about my answer overnight, and my first paragraph is wrong. The standard statement form is 'You might have read ...', so the standard question form is 'Might you have read ...?', not 'Might have you read ...' (though some people might say that, accidentally or otherwise) in informal speech. The other issue is the placement of 'ever'. 'Might you ever have read ...' is probably more standard than 'Might you have ever read ...' but neither of them shows up on Google Ngrams.]

'Might have you ...?' is (just) possible but is extremely rare (Google Ngram - by itself and with 'have you') and extremely awkward. More natural questions are 'Might you possibly have read ...?' or 'Is is possible that you have read ...?'.

'Might you had ...' is grammatically incorrect. 'Might' (and all other modal verbs) must be followed by a verb in its base form - 'have', not 'has' or 'had' or 'having'.

Where did you read or hear these sentences, or did you write them yourself?

[Edit: this sentence is wrong - see below] 'Might have you ...?' is (just) possible but is extremely rare (Google Ngram - by itself and with 'have you') and extremely awkward. [This sentence is still true] More natural questions are 'Might you possibly have read ...?' or 'Is is possible that you have read ...?'.

'Might you had ...' is grammatically incorrect. 'Might' (and all other modal verbs) must be followed by a verb in its base form - 'have', not 'has' or 'had' or 'having'.

Where did you read or hear these sentences, or did you write them yourself?

[Edit: I have thought about my answer overnight, and my first paragraph is wrong. The standard statement form is 'You might have read ...', so the standard question form is 'Might you have read ...?', not 'Might have you read ...' (though some people might say that, accidentally or otherwise) in informal speech. The other issue is the placement of 'ever'. 'Might you ever have read ...' is probably more standard than 'Might you have ever read ...' but neither of them shows up on Google Ngrams.]

1
source | link

'Might have you ...?' is (just) possible but is extremely rare (Google Ngram - by itself and with 'have you') and extremely awkward. More natural questions are 'Might you possibly have read ...?' or 'Is is possible that you have read ...?'.

'Might you had ...' is grammatically incorrect. 'Might' (and all other modal verbs) must be followed by a verb in its base form - 'have', not 'has' or 'had' or 'having'.

Where did you read or hear these sentences, or did you write them yourself?