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A question How to choose from a junior L. learner: "There'There is no chair or/ There isn't a chair / There are no chairs / There aren't any chairschairs'?"

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or preferedpreferred to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why"Why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

A question from a junior L. learner: "There is no chair or There aren't any chairs?"

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or prefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

How to choose from 'There is no chair / There isn't a chair / There are no chairs / There aren't any chairs'?

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or preferred to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "Why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

4 added 20 characters in body; edited title
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There A question from a junior L. learner: "There is no chair or There are/is notaren't any/a chairs?"

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be somethingsomething that determines which structure to be usedused or preferedprefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here''there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'"'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

There is no There are/is not any/a

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or prefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

A question from a junior L. learner: "There is no chair or There aren't any chairs?"

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or prefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

3 added 3 characters in body
source | link

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or prefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or prefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how answer!

This question might seem a bit of a cliche. I looked for duplicates and found two but the answers were not convincing. I even went through other forums to find similar questions; interestingly the respondents weren't sure at all or gave irrelevant answers. So, I'm going to be clear as much as possible and keep things to the point to get the point I'm looking for.

I know all about singular/plural countable or uncountable thing about these structures and possible grammatical sentences out of them. My question is probably about the register, being more common, expectation, emphasis, or something like that.

Where do native speakers tend to say each of these statements and why?

There is no chair here.

There isn't a chair here.

There are no chairs here.

There aren't any chairs here.

I think there must be something that determines which structure to be used or prefered to the other one. What is that?!

If someone asks me "why did you say, 'there aren't any chairs here' and not 'there is no chair here'" what should I say?! Why would I choose singular form over plural form?!

Actually a junior language learner asked me that and I wasn't sure how to answer!

2 added 83 characters in body
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