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I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be, according to the dictionary then, used with "have" or "find". But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?

EDIT: After some discussion with some forum members, it was pointed out that the following:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. The scene awoke a warrior in John.

use two different definitions of "in". Why is that?

I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be, according to the dictionary then, used with "have" or "find". But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?

I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be, according to the dictionary then, used with "have" or "find". But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?

EDIT: After some discussion with some forum members, it was pointed out that the following:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. The scene awoke a warrior in John.

use two different definitions of "in". Why is that?

2 added 8 characters in body
source | link

I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be, according to the dictionary then, used with "have" or "find" according to the dictionary. But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?

I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be used with "have" or "find" according to the dictionary. But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?

I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be, according to the dictionary then, used with "have" or "find". But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?

1
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Face A Common Enemy

I have question about the usage of "in".

According to definition 22 of this dictionary for "in" , "in" could be used like these sentences:

  1. You have a very good friend in Pat.
  2. In Dwight D. Eisenhower the Republicans had found the ideal candidate.

So, this sense of "in" should be used with "have" or "find" according to the dictionary. But then, I found this news article:

Still, Mr. Maliki’s support of the Kurds came after weeks in which the two militaries kept an uneasy distance from each other, even as Western officials, arguing that they faced a common enemy in ISIS, urged cooperation.

The verb "face" is neither "have" or "find". So, is the usage in news article wrong?