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Suppose I want to say

Why does your method work? Why doesn't mine work?

in one sentence. Shoud I say

Why does your method work but mine doesn't?

or

Why does your method work but doesn't mine?

  • But is awkward here. Instead: Why does your method work while mine doesn't? – P. E. Dant Aug 9 '16 at 17:02
  • Thanks. So do you mean I should use the first sentence (with "but" changed to "while"), and the second is wrong? – Qian Aug 9 '16 at 17:04
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    Correct. You only invert the order for the first part. – Catija Aug 9 '16 at 17:05
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Why does your method work but mine doesn't?

and

Why does your method work while mine doesn't?

They're both absolutely fine because that's how native speakers typically say it. Though, some might argue that the second way sounds a little bit better.

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    Why are they fine? What's wrong with the other option? Please make your answer more helpful by explaining rather than making statements. – Catija Aug 9 '16 at 17:35

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