3

Example:

Q. Why do the Alabama Crimson Tide have an elephant as their mascot?

A. A fan called them elephants during a 1930 game against Ole Miss and the name stuck.

"At the end of the quarter, the earth started to tremble," sportswriter Everett Strupper wrote in the October 8, 1930, Atlanta Journal. “Some excited fan in the stands bellowed, ‘Hold your horses, the elephants are coming,’ and out stamped this Alabama varsity.’’ Sportswriters dubbed the team’s linemen the “Red Elephants.”

That 1930 team had a 10-0 record, outscored its opponents 217-13, defeated Washington State in the Rose Bowl, and was declared national champions.

I'm not exactly sure what that means.

  • 1
    The magician waved his wand over the hat and out popped this rabbit. Storytelling style. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 10 '16 at 15:26
  • @MarkH - Great answer (hint, hint). – J.R. Aug 10 '16 at 16:26
  • @MarkHubbard At dictionary.com, the 2nd definition of stamp as instrasitive is: to strike the foot forcibly or noisily downward. Hint hint hint. – P. E. Dant Aug 10 '16 at 18:33
  • Um, why is there a proofreading close vote on this? – M.A.R. Aug 10 '16 at 19:31
  • In addition to MH's fine answer, I'd add that it is a very fine example of Subject Complement inversion. The Locative Complement of the verb "come" here is the preposition "out". The Subject is "this Alabama varsity", which means the university football team. The Subject and the Complement have swapped places. The normal phrase order is "[This Alabama varsity (team] stamped [out]. "Out" here means 'out onto the pitch'. – Araucaria - Not here any more. Aug 18 '16 at 13:35
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"At the end of the quarter, the earth started to tremble," sportswriter Everett Strupper wrote in the October 8, 1930, Atlanta Journal. “Some excited fan in the stands bellowed, ‘Hold your horses, the elephants are coming,’ and out stamped this Alabama varsity.’’ Sportswriters dubbed the team’s linemen the “Red Elephants.”

The bolded phrase means,

"Members of the varsity football team of the University of Alabama ran out onto the playing field"; i.e., as metaphorical "elephants," the team of football players "stamped" onto the field to begin the game.

It's a bit of poetic license on the part of the sports writer. Stamped here means,

"to walk with forcible or heavy, resounding steps: e.g., He stamped out of the room in anger."

(From definition 12 of "stamp" at Dictionary.com)

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