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Therefore the Court remands this matter to Commerce a second time for it to select a margin that is “a reasonably accurate estimate of the respondent’s actual rate, albeit with some built in increase intended as a deterrent to noncompliance.”

quoted from Decisions of the United States Court of International Trade.

I'm curious about the sentence's structure.

I understand the meaning of phrase "The court remands A to B"

However, I'm not sure how "a second time for it to select a margin" fits into the sentence above. It is like "The court remands A to B C" and it looks weird to me (nevertheless I can still interpret the sentence)

What's the function of "a second time for it to select a margin" in the sentence above and is it grammatically correct?

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  • A link to the original article would be helpful. – Peter Aug 11 '16 at 5:05
  • for a second time and for it to select a margin are separate phrases. Think of it this way: the Court remands the matter to Commerce. The Court remands the matter to Commerce for a second time. The Court remands the matter to Commerce so that Commerce can select a margin. – stangdon Aug 11 '16 at 8:29
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It means that the Court has previously remanded the matter to Commerce and it now remands the matter to Commerce for a second time. Further, the Court expects Commerce to select a margin of the type specified.

It may or may not be that the Court gave this particular instruction when it first remanded the matter.

It's grammatical.

. . . [A] second time for it to select a margin might be called an adverbial in some grammars. Its purpose is to provide information about how and why the matter was remanded.

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