2

Using case-control, cohort, and case-crossover analysis, the investigators found that tramadol increased the risk of hospitalization for hypoglycemia by more than three-fold, with the risk particularly elevated in the first 30 days of treatment.

In my opinion, "with" is just a preposition. And after preposition we only need a noun or noun phrase. But in this sentence, it seems that "with" has the function of conjunction. Is it true? would you explain it for me, please!

1
  • "With" is a preposition and preps freely take clausal complements, both finite and non-finite (like yours). Here, the PP is an adjunct (grammatically optional).
    – user36764
    Aug 11, 2016 at 11:39

1 Answer 1

1

Here, "with" means "accompanied by". There is an implied "being" between "risk" and "particularly elevated". That is, the sentence is equivalent to:

Using case-control, cohort, and case-crossover analysis, the investigators found that tramadol increased the risk of hospitalization for hypoglycemia by more than three-fold, accompanied by the risk being particularly elevated in the first 30 days of treatment.

Though, of course, the original is more idiomatic and flows better.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .