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Is it correct to use present perfect when specific time is implicit? For example.

Jack has already been to Paris. He has liked it a lot.

I have already tasted sushi. I have hated it.

We've had an awesome wedding party. Several long time friends have come.

Or should I use past simple for the second sentence, as the specific time was implied in the first sentence? (meaning that the second sentence occurred when he was to Paris; when she tasted sushi; and when we had the wedding party.)

Jack has already been to Paris. He liked it a lot.

I have already tasted sushi. I hated it.

We've had an awesome wedding party. Several long time friends came.

You see, in my opinion, I should use the second option as the specific time is implied but, maybe, grammatically speaking, it does not matter. Take the third example: it is my understanding that everything I tell about what happened in that party should be reported in past simple tense. Am I wrong?

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The second group is more correct. And the two groups mean different things.

Let's begin with the first group:

Jack has already been to Paris. He has liked it a lot.

Doesn't make much sense. The only possible meaning of this would be that Jack once liked Paris (and presumably doesn't like it anymore.) But if that was the intended meaning (which it might not have been?), it would be much better to say:

Jack has already been to Paris. He used to like Paris a lot.


Moving on:

I have already tasted sushi. I have hated it.

This also doesn't make sense. "I have hated it" would mean that you hated sushi for certain periods of time, but presumably not anymore. If this is what you wanted to say (which I don't think it was?), then you could instead have said:

I've had sushi before, and I've also hated sushi at times.


Further:

We've had an awesome wedding party. Several long time friends have come.

This could actually be correct. But only if the wedding party is still ongoing, and at its very end, and your friends are still there.

For example, you're giving a speech at the end of the wedding party:

We've had an awesome wedding party, and it now seems to be at an end. Several long time friends have come. We've had excellent food. We've gotten beautiful gifts. Thank you all for coming, and for all your kind words.



The second group makes more sense:

Jack has already been to Paris. He liked it a lot.

This means that Jack liked Paris when he visited and it also implies that he might still like Paris (unless followed by a contradiction.)

The same thing goes for the sushi example in the same box.

We've had an awesome wedding party. Several long time friends came.

How long ago was the wedding party? If it happened a day or more ago, it's better to say "We had." If it just ended or is at its end right now, then "We've had" is suitable.

So the second group is more correct. And the meanings are quite different in the two groups.

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    "The guiding principle should be don't use Past Perfect unless you really have to" -- FumbleFingers. The effort, taken to write this, alone deserves upvote. – Rompey Sep 19 '16 at 14:57
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The second version, with the simple past, is correct. I would even say that in the third example, you should also say "We had an awesome wedding party." Unless there is some connection to the present moment, like "We've just had an awesome wedding party." or "We've already had an awesome wedding party.", then I would use the simple past.

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