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On a website, I saw a line that said:

In Information Technology, the “network” defines the layered infrastructure by which information is moved. Given the vital nature of a well-functioning, properly executed network, it is also acknowledged that the strength of any business network is essentially its weakest link.

What do they mean by "the weakest link"?

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This is the same advice you'd get on any complex system; "a chain is only as strong as its weakest link". If you are running your office from a core switch with non-redundant supervisors or uplinks, then taking down the one will knock you offline, so use as much redundancy on critical paths as makes sense businesswise.

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    It's worth pointing out that the maxim you mention - "a chain is only as strong as its weakest link" – is a rather established proverb in English. I can easily see where someone unfamiliar with the saying would be confused about the usage of "the weakest link," particularly in the context of networks, where, unlike in chains, links aren't generally thought of as "strong" or "weak." – J.R. Sep 10 '13 at 9:20

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