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Are there any difference between these two? Which is stylistically better?

At the present time, there are numerous learning corpora for English. Most of them are focused on learner-written texts.

At the present time, there are numerous learning corpora for English. Most of these corpora are focused on learner-written texts

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    There is no difference in meaning between the two, and in terms of style, neither is preferable. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 14 '16 at 6:20
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    The whole point of using a pronoun like "them" as a pro-form is to avoid unnecessary repetition of old information. The noun phrase "learning corpora" is old information; it has already been mentioned in the previous sentence and your listener grasps what it is you're saying about them, so there is no real need to repeat the phrase or part of it. You could also replace the full stop with a lighter punctuation mark like a semi-colon (or even a dash): "...learning corpora for English; most of them are focused on ..." – user36764 Aug 14 '16 at 7:48
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    @PaulM Thank you, actually one of my concerns was about the full stop and using "them" in a separate sentence. – Ahmad Aug 14 '16 at 10:56
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    If we're going to avoid unnecessary repetition of old info, we can simply say "...; most are focused..." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 14 '16 at 11:26
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They both mean the same thing. Neither is particularly preferable but the second sounds more similar to a speech or a very fluid style of presentation. The former sounds more similar to informal conversation.

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