2

I know we can use "have" with "class" like:

I have a class tomorrow morning.

But can I use it like:

This is not an appropriate room to have a class in it.

  • Yes. The first have is owning an obligation/appointment/commitment. The second is more like conduct/perform/carry out. Slightly different meanings but both are valid. – shawnt00 Aug 16 '16 at 17:06
  • Or This is not an appropriate room in which to have a class. – P. E. Dant Aug 16 '16 at 17:48
2

Yes, you may use "have" in that way.

this is not an appropriate room to have a class in (it)

It sounds more natural to me to not have the "it" at the end because "this" already refers to the room.

  • 2
    Completely agree that the it is wrong. – shawnt00 Aug 16 '16 at 17:04
1

Your use of have is OK, but the sentence with appropriate and in it is marginal.

Consider:

GRAMMATICAL

This garage isn't big enough to have a limousine in it.

This garage isn't big enough for a limousine.

This is not a big enough garage for a limousine.

This garage is not appropriate for a limousine.

This is not an appropriate garage for a limousine.

MARGINAL

This is not an appropriate garage to have a limousine in it.

This garage is not appropriate to have a limousine in it.

GRAMMATICAL

This is not a good place to have a wedding.

This is not a good place to have a wedding in.

This place is not good enough to have a wedding in it.

MARGINAL

This is not a good place to have a wedding in it.

These loose floorboards are not suitable to have a dance on them.

  • "appropriate" is fine in this case since "room" is generic. It's weird to say "appropriate garage" since the purpose of a garage is to store cars. Statements about size are more likely. You also would more likely say "This is not a good place to have a wedding at" instead of "in". The floorboards example sounds clumsy. If you are specifically talking about "floorboards" you would more likely say "not suitable to dance on" or "not suitable for dancing" not "not suitable to have a dance on" – eques Aug 16 '16 at 19:31
  • The concerns you raise are not grammatical concerns, and don't address the gist of the matter. We can change the examples. This unstable floor is not suitable to have a dance on it. (not grammatical, because of "it") – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 16 '16 at 20:42
  • It addresses your assertion that they are "marginal" usages. The fact is if you say something like "This is not an appropriate garage to have a limousine in it." to a native speaker, they would likely be puzzled. And your assertion that "This is not an appropriate room to have a class in it." is marginal is questionable. The only real issue is the "in it"; appropriate is fine. – eques Aug 16 '16 at 20:51
  • Bare adjectives like suitable, good, safe, appropriate, etc behave differently than adjectives with enough or too. "This floor is too unstable to have a dance on it" is not ungrammatical; but "This floor is unsafe to have a dance on it" is ungrammatical. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 16 '16 at 21:03
  • "The floor is too unstable to have a dance on it" is grammatical, but odd (generally describing a floor as "unstable" would likely mean you don't want to dance on it). "The floor is unsafe to have a dance on it" is perfectly grammatical. – eques Aug 16 '16 at 21:08

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