2

I drove down there.

I drove up there.

What's the difference between them?

5

If I live to the North of, or at a higher elevation than my destination, I might say:

I drove down there.

Similarly, if I live to the South of, or at a lower elevation than my destination, I might say:

I drove up there.

However, both expressions are highly idiomatic in English, and are often used to connote merely driving, without any reference to compass or sea level.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Or "down into the valley" or "up into the hills". – user3169 Aug 16 '16 at 19:40
  • @user3169 +1 Incorporated... – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 16 '16 at 19:57
  • 1
    Yeah... pretty much. Sometimes, I'll say "up" and then realize I'm talking about a place that's south of me and I'll correct myself... but usually I just use them interchangeably. – Catija Aug 16 '16 at 20:00

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