0

Is there a flaw in the following sentence?

I think it best to be well-prepared for the exam.

Should it become this?

I think that it is best to be well-prepared for the exam.

I am a bit confused because I read this in a text where the author does not appear to have any grammatical (or spelling) errors except possibly this one.

4
  • In general, if you could also provide a source or a link, that might be helpful.
    – Em.
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 5:16
  • 1
    @Max I don't see why providing a source is necessary. Are you suggesting that it might depend on the context?
    – Quelqu'un
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 5:17
  • 2
    In general, the context is very helpful.
    – Em.
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 5:20
  • @Max thank you. I really forgot where I read this. I'll make sure to provide the context in the next time.
    – Quelqu'un
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 5:23

1 Answer 1

3

There is nothing wrong or not understandable with your sentence

I think (that) it (is) best to be well-prepared for the exam.

Dropping "that" and "is" would be considered to be a stylistic choice rather than a grammatical error.

3
  • So, all of the following are grammatically correct? (1) "I think that it is best to be well-prepared for the exam"; (2) "I think it is best to be well-prepared for the exam"; (3) "I think that it best to be well-prepared for the exam"; (4) "I think it best to be well-prepared for the exam".
    – Quelqu'un
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 5:29
  • 3
    #3 is not grammatically correct @Quelqu'un And the most common version in everyday spoken English is "I think it's best to be well-prepared for the exam." Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 6:21
  • 1
    Also possible is "I think it best that one be well-prepared for the exam".
    – Peter
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 7:06

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .